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Cinzano 1757 Rosso Vermouth

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Cinzano 1757 Rosso Vermouth
£19.99

The Cinzano 1757 Rosso enriches and enhances the most famous classic cocktails such as the Negroni and the Americano.


Smooth spiced notes followed by dried fruit, dried figs in particular, married with woody, vanilla and sour black cherry aromas. Initial slightly spiced and dried fruit notes; rounded and smooth to the palate, with notes of wood, tobacco and licorice. In the end, pleasant bitter notes, typical Artemisia, with long-lasting and pleasant aftertaste.

Description

Details

On 6 June 1757, Carlo and Giovanni Cinzano were awarded the prestigious title of Master Distillers. From their small shop in Turin, Italy, the two brothers started a new trend with their unique aromatic wines made from a secret recipe combining local herbs, spices and wines.

With the company's growing reputation for quality and innovation. Cinzano was asked by the Savoy monarchs to create a wine to rival the French champagne wines, which were taking the world by storm. In 1840, Cinzano produced its first-ever sparkling wine.

Printed colour labels were introduced in 1853 by Cinzano to replace the handmade ones. The Cinzano family realised that they needed to make their bottles brighter and more appealing. As well as adding colour, they decided to incorporate their products’ awards into the labels.

Cinzano captured the imagination of consumers around the globe with the start of one of the first – and longest-running – dynamic advertising and communications campaigns. The first Cinzano advertisement appeared in the newspaper ‘Il Telegrafo’ in the city of Leghorn on 8 and 9 December 1887. It can be translated as ‘Vermouth wine from the renowned house of F. Cinzano’ (Italian: ‘Vino Vermouth della rinomata Casa F. Cinzano’).

Two years later, in 1889, Adolf Hoeinstein - the founder of Italian print advertising - was commissioned to come up with the first full colour poster design. This marked the beginning of the association between Cinzano and the famous contemporay Illustrators.

The company stepped up its advertising again in 1910. Cinzano hired the artist Leonetto Cappiello to develop several design suggestions. Keen to promote the brand in bars, Cinzano produced a range of display items using Cappiello’s highly exotic design. This once again shows that the family appreciated the need to present their products to customers in an appealing way.

Despite WW1, Cinzano continued to capture the spirit of the times and reached out to the weary population by relating a series of adverts to the war effort. With spirits high following the end of the Great War, Cinzano then commissioned the most important illustrators of the time to capture key issues of the day. Cinzano ran a large number of poster advertisements during the Roaring Twenties, and created some of the most famous Italian historical posters.

A new blue and red logo was introduced in 1925. The red symbolises passion, pride and vivacious radiance. The blue represents nobility, tradition and the depth of the Mediterranean. Together the two colours represent ‘Italianness’. The upward diagonal slash between them was designed to symbolise the upward path of the company.

The time from Black Tuesday (1929) until the end of WW2 marks one of the most difficult periods in the history of Cinzano. Miraculously, Cinzano still found a way to be in touch with its consumers, lifting their spirits with the launch of the Gran Concurso – a contest that ran right up until the end of the war.

Keeping up with the times, Cinzano refocused its advertising on cinema, radio and television and created over 230 (!) unforgotten television adverts between 1957 and 1980. The most successful of these was probably the series of jingles with Rita Pavone (‘Cin cin Cinzoda / una voglia da morir …’ – ‘Cheers cheers Cinzoda / to die for …’). ‘Cin cin’ has been used as a toast in Italy ever since.

After a couple of hard years and a decrease in brand communications, Cinzano was resurrected when, in 1999, Gruppo Campari acquired the brand, giving it a fresh and bold outlook for the new millennium. The image of Cinzano – a little cheeky, to be shared amongst friends on special occasions or just for fun – was also revived and again proved a source of great success.

Not many brands can look back on an uninterrupted 250-year history – and even fewer have made it to this ripe age with the unique freshness and vitality that has distinguished Cinzano throughout its long and colourful history. To celebrate, Cinzano once again commissioned one of the best contemporary artists – Selwyn Senatori – to come up with a series of paintings inspired by Cinzano and the Italian way of life.

Following the success of their partnership in 2007, Cinzano asked Selwyn Senatori to bring to life the ‘true spirit’ of Cinzano in new, colourful, fun-loving paintings. Each painting embodies the true spirit of Cinzano and expresses Cinzano’s fundamental brand values, such as ‘evolving tradition’, ‘Italian heritage’ and ‘natural style’. Selwyn Senatori depicted these values in light-hearted and authentic social situations.

This unique premium vermouth has been bottled to celebrate and pay homage to Cinzano’s founding fathers, Giovanni Giacomo and Carlo Stefano, who in 1757 started their business in Turin. Cinzano 1757 is a small batch, hand crafted vermouth gently infused with the finest blend of mature aromatics.

The Cinzano 1757 Rosso enriches and enhances the most famous classic cocktails such as the Negroni and the Americano.

Tasting Notes
Smooth spiced notes followed by dried fruit, dried figs in particular, married with woody, vanilla and sour black cherry aromas. Initial slightly spiced and dried fruit notes; rounded and smooth to the palate, with notes of wood, tobacco and licorice. In the end, pleasant bitter notes, typical Artemisia, with long-lasting and pleasant aftertaste.

Additional Information

Additional Information

Name Cinzano 1757 Rosso Vermouth
Country Italy
Region Turin
ABV% 16%
Size 1l
Dietary Information No
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